Home News MrDeadMoth and partner have a “toxic relationship,” says brother

MrDeadMoth and partner have a “toxic relationship,” says brother

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Regardless, domestic violence is inexcusable.

The brother of disgraced Twitch streamer Luke ‘MrDeadMoth’ Munday says he and his partner have a “toxic relationship” with a history of disputes.

“They have a toxic relationship with so many domestics it’s hard to keep track of them,”  Munday’s brother Daniel told Daily Mail Australia.

“Their arguments can be brutal and Luke has moved back to our grandparents’ house numerous times afterwards. After a few weeks the dust settles, they patch things up and he goes back to live with her, they’re good for a little bit, and then it happens again.”

The report goes into detail of a number of fights between Luke Munday and his partner, Grace Campbell, including incidents which culminated in an AVO (Apprehended Violence Order) against Munday in one case and a restraining order against Campbell in the other.

MrDeadMoth’s brother said both parties in the relationship needed counselling and that he’s most concerned for the couple’s two children.

“I’m not siding with Luke or excusing his actions, I don’t even really like him, but the real victims are their kids,” Daniel Munday continued. “He’s recently been snapping back at her harder and she knew he was close to breaking point. They both need help but refuse to get it and I’ve been worried it could escalate into something really bad.”

MrDeadMoth was charged in early December 2018 after allegedly assaulting Campbell during a Fornite livestream. The streamer made a brief reappearance on Twitch before being banned a second time earlier this month.

Daniel Munday also said be believed his brother had an addiction to video games.

“Gaming has always been an escape from how we grew up for him and recently [Luke’s] gotten addicted to it again,” Daniel said.

If you or someone you know is suffering in Australia due to domestic violence, Stevivor strongly encourages you to head to 1800Respect.org.au or dial 1800 737 732. Additional state-based resources can be accessed here.