In-depth

Xbox Series S, Xbox Series X compared: Price, specs and more

The Xbox Series S has officially been announced, and this post is designed to help you compare it to the Xbox Series X. Let’s get into it!

Xbox Series S

The Xbox Series S is smaller and cheaper than the Xbox Series X, but that also means it doesn’t boast the same performance levels as the Series X.

The discless console is all-digital (naturally), is roughly 60% smaller than the Xbox Series X and could have definitely used an Xbox logo overlayed on a giant circular black vent found on the top of the otherwise all-white console.

As we detailed last night, the Xbox Series S will play games in 1080p or 1440p at up to 120 frames-per-second (FPS), though it can upscale titles into 4K as well. It also offers next-gen improvements including ray-tracing and variable rate shading and refresh rate. On the gaming front, it’s important to remember that both next-gen consoles will play all new Xbox titles as well as be able to play most Xbox 360 and some original Xbox titles through backwards compatibility.

It will stream media content from sources such as Netflix in 4K.



Processor 8x Cores @ 3.8 GHz (3.66 GHz w/ SMT) Custom Zen 2 CPU
Graphics 4 TFLOPS, 20 CUs @ 1.55 GHz Custom RDNA 2 GPU
Memory 10 GB GDDR6
Internal Storage 512 GB Custom NVME SSD
Expandable Storage 1 TB Expansion Card
External Storage USB 3.2 External HDD Support
Optical Drive None
Performance Target Up to 1440p @ 120 FPS
Color Matte White, Black
Dimensions 275mm x 151mm x 63.5mm
Price $499 AUD, $299 USD, £249, €299
Release date 10 November 2020

 

Australian pricing has yet to be confirmed, but we’ll update this as we know more. In the USA, the Xbox Series S is also available via Xbox All Access for $25 USD/month.

Related: Xbox Series outright purchasing versus xbox all access plans

Xbox Series X

The Xbox Series X is Microsoft’s flagship next-gen console, offering the ability to play games in 4K (and up to 8K if you somehow have a TV that supports it) with a 60FPS target, but capable of up to 120FPS as well.

Again, it’s important to remember that both next-gen consoles will play all new Xbox titles — though the Series X will offer expanded options in comparison to the Series S — as well as be able to play most Xbox 360 and some original Xbox titles through backwards compatibility.

We’ve known about its specs since February of this year.



Release dateBelieved to be 10 November 2020

Processor 8x Cores @ 3.8 GHz (3.66 GHz w/ SMT) Custom Zen 2 CPU
Graphics 12 TFLOPS, 52 CUs @ 1.825 GHz Custom RDNA 2 GPU
Memory 16 GB GDDR6 w/ 320mb bus
Internal Storage 1 TB Custom NVME SSD
Expandable Storage 1 TB Expansion Card
External Storage USB 3.2 External HDD Support
Optical Drive 4K UHD Blu-Ray Drive
Performance Target 4K @ 60 FPS, up to 120 FPS
Color Matte Black
Dimensions 301mm x 151mm x 151mm
Price $749 AUD, $499 USD

 

Pricing hasn’t been detailed as yet, but it’s believed the Xbox Series X will cost $499 USD and will be available on an Xbox All Access plan for $35 USD/month. Australian pricing, of course, hasn’t been detailed.

We’ll update this post as we learn more.

This article may contain affiliate links, meaning we could earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. Stevivor is an independent outlet and our journalism is in no way influenced by any advertiser or commercial initiative.

About the author

Steve Wright

Steve's the owner of this very site and an active games journalist for the past ten years. He's a Canadian-Australian gay gaming geek, ice hockey player and fan. Husband to Matt and cat dad to Wally and Quinn.