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Xbox All Access lets you rent-to-own an Xbox One in the USA

Xbox All Access was today announced by Microsoft, a 24 month rent-to-own program that includes an Xbox One and Xbox Game Pass & Xbox Live Gold subscriptions.

Available in the USA only — though ironically announced by Microsoft’s Global Product Marketing Manager — the program has no upfront costs, 0% APR and 24 months.

For $21.99 USD a month for 24 months, users can grab an Xbox One S, Xbox Game Pass and Xbox Live Gold. Or, for $34.99 USD a month for 24 months, users can upgrade to an Xbox One X. Financing is “powered by Dell Preferred Account.”

The offer is available for a limited time at the Microsoft Store; those interested can head here for further details.

Doing the math, it’s a great deal — here’s what everything would cost in USD separately:

  • Xbox One X: $499 USD
  • 24 months Xbox Game Pass: $239.76 USD (at full price)
  • 24 months Xbox Live Gold: $119.98 USD (at full price)

Subtracting the subscription costs from the Xbox All Access cost of $839.76 USD, that means you’re getting the console for $480.02 USD. Not bad, eh?

A cool deal, to be sure… but once again, here’s a cool Xbox initiative that Aussies don’t have access to. Would you rather this or Xbox Design Labs, gamers?


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About the author

Steve Wright

Steve's the owner of this very site and an active games journalist for the past ten years. He's a Canadian-Australian gay gaming geek, ice hockey player and fan. Husband to Matt and cat dad to Wally and Quinn.

About the author

Jay Ball

I'm a big fan of older consoles and can flawlessly complete the first 2 levels of Donkey Kong Country with my eyes closed. These days I still play platformers but also love shooters, arcade racers and action adventure titles. I may or may not be in denial about the death of rhythm games.