Anal probes and alien drugs are why Saints Row IV was refused classification
26 Jun 2013   Home » News » Anal probes and alien dru... Share

Anal probes and alien drugs are why Saints Row IV was refused classification


Thanks to Kotaku Australia we can now reveal that the offending culprits in the Australian Classification Board’s decision to refuse classification for Saints Row IV. Regarding the “implied sexual violence” the ACB report states;

The game includes a weapon referred to by the Applicant as an “Alien Anal Probe”. The Applicant states that this weapon can be “shoved into enemy’s backsides”. The lower half of the weapon resembles a sword hilt and the upper part contains prong-like appendages which circle around what appears to be a large dildo which runs down the centre of the weapon. When using this weapon the player approaches a (clothed) victim from behind and thrusts the weapon between the victim’s legs and then lifts them off the ground before pulling a trigger which launches the victim into the air. After the probe has been implicitly inserted into the victim’s anus the area around their buttocks becomes pixelated highlighting that the aim of the weapon is to penetrate the victim’s anus. The weapon can be used during gameplay on enemy characters or civilians. In the Board’s opinion, a weapon designed to penetrate the anus of enemy characters and civilians constitutes a visual depiction of implied sexual violence that is interactive and not justified by context and as such the game should be Refused Classification.

The media release posted yesterday also made mention of “illicit or proscribed drug use related to incentives or rewards” which contributed to the decision to refuse classification. In relation to the illicit drugs the ACB report states;

The game contains an optional mission which involves the player obtaining and smoking drugs referred to as “alien narcotics”. Smoking the “alien narcotics” equips the player with “superpowers” which increase their in-game abilities allowing them to progress through the mission more easily.

What do you think? Did the Australian Classification Board make the right call?

Leo Stevenson

Leo Stevenson

I've been playing games for the past 25 years and have been writing for almost as long. Combining two passions in the way I'm able is a true privilege. I'm mostly drawn to single player, story driven games and couch co-op, but will occasionally delve into multiplayer.